Bright Side of Things

“Hope is the pillar that holds up the world. Hope is the dream of a waking man”
~ Pliny the Elder

Early Bird

Happy bird sings
Caught a worm and golden sun
Hopes blossomed

©Alka

images (7)

Here’s some more:

Give It All
Flowers sing and die

Unheard, their beck and call
‘Give it all’

©Alka

     ~~~

“Hope is being able to see that there is light despite all of the darkness.”
~~Desmond Tutu

Wishful Thinking

We always see the bright side
We’re keeping our hopes alive
That the day will never come
When birds stop singing
When flowers forget to bloom
As the earth burns down
As we bring on our doom

©Alka

d2f210eebb4ddfc22fbc7bd747adc78b

~~~~ ~~~~ ~~~~

I wrote the above haiku and the short poem for two challenges.
Ronovan Writes Weekly Haiku Challenge 106 hosted by Ronovan Writes. The two words for this week were Flower & Sing.
Also for Writer’s Quote Wednesday Weekly Challenge hosted by Colleen of The Silver Threading. This week’s theme was: Hope

Hope you enjoyed my poems!

Never Say Die

P1050633 m.JPG

~ Ornamental flowers and Dandelion weeds in the same yard ~

 

Never Say Die

Soaked alike in golden sun
Who looks better?
the flowers or the weeds
the accepted or the rejected
the adored or the detested

Side-by-side in their race
for life. Who wins better?
the docile or the aggressive
the frail or the hardy
the shy or the pushy

Hated by the natives, the
resilient all-pervading wilds
stay on, though stomped and razed
shine on, with their heads raised
Indefatigable and unrelenting
thick-skinned stubborns, absorb
nicks and kicks, to unashamedly
survive and thrive; never say die

©2016 Alka

~~~ ~~~

For: The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge Opposites

These Festivals of Light…of Hope, Faith and Love  

Featured

Most of the prominent festivals celebrated by us humans, irrespective of faith or religion, are in some way a Festival of Light.

Not all are referred to as that, but they are so because lightening up of the surrounds – to whatever degree – is an essential part of Diwali, Christmas, Gurpurab, Eid and many others that I have unintentionally not listed here.

Festivals of Light are also festivals of darkness, for they go hand in hand. But how’s it so?

Light seems bright only because of darkness. Try lighting a lamp during the day. During broad daylight in a well lit room, if we accidentally put our electric bulbs and tube-lights on, we put them off instantly…‘Oh! That was accidental. We don’t need you as yet. Let darkness arrive!.’

And when after its long and tiring work-day, as sun begins to set and darkness takes over charge…that’s when we definitely and immediately need light in any form, howsoever little.

Thus if there’s no darkness there would be no value of light. Darkness renders light indispensable to us. In moments when darkness is unbearable and fearsome, it is the illuminating light that provides everyday comfort, while taking away our fear of the unknown thus adding to our happiness.

All in all, these facts were well known to our human ancestors who thronged the earth ages ago. Hence, after their initial hit and trials of rubbing stones to produce fire (and light) they experimented in all possible ways to create light so as to make their lives easy.

In very olden days, esp. here as I talk in the contexts of India, when there was no electricity, people depended on earthen lamps, candles, lanterns to get rid of physical darkness and facilitate visibility.

At the same time, they very keenly sought spiritual light in the form of ancient wisdom that’s written all over in the ancient books.

“Aum Asato ma sad gamaya
Tamaso ma jyotir gamaya
Mṛtyorma amṛtam gamaya
Aum shanti shanti shantih “

The above lines in Sanskrit that were taken from the Upanishads textbooks mean –

“From Ignorance, lead me to Truth;
From Darkness, lead me to Light;
From Death, lead me to Immortality
Peace, peace, peace !!” –

Given the importance they gave to the very concept of light, those days in India offering ‘light’ to others in any form was considered a noble task of charity. ‘diwali-smallDeep-daan’, is the term used for thus donating light, that is lighting a ‘deep’ or an earthen lamp for others. It’s a charity of light, and the purpose was to help others dispel darkness around them.

So, from what I’ve heard, after sunset our ancient people used to habitually and regularly go to choraha – the road-crossings and light a lamp there.

Numerous such lamps would become a full-fledged light system, and these groups of lamps would illuminate the pathway of every passer-by. This was esp. beneficial on the darkest of nights, and that’s what it is on every Diwali night, as it is a new moon or moon-less night each Diwali.

Moreover, thus lighting up each other’s path meant not only illuminating others’ path but simultaneously radiating your own path as well.

Yes!!  Lighting up others’ path automatically lights up your own path as well.

But. In order to light up somebody’s path, you have to have a light of your own, even if it‘s meant to be given away to others.

So, please do give it a thought.

Nowadays we don’t have any dearth of man-made electronic light devices. But even now, although we take light for granted, this same light continues its traditional role of giving us happiness. Thousands of years later, this festivals of light still continue to be symbolic of light’s victory over darkness and victory of goodness over evil.

In my immediate surroundings, on my street here in Sydney, I feel we need more street-lights as it sometimes gets too dark. Reporting this to the council has not yielded forth any positive results yet. So everyday, at around sunset time, I make sure I put on the lights in my outer verandah and outer porch.

This light overflows to the street beyond my house and possibly helps people coming home late, esp. as many university students do that. It probably deters the thieves as well.  I do this for few hours each day, particularly on the darkest new-moon nights that have no moonlight of its own.

Help those who have no light of their own, no hope and love; those who have lost their inner light and brightness. That’s the true essence of every festival.  That is, other than wearing good clothes and eating lots of sweets.

13BGPALACE_ILLUMIN_1583508f

Mysore Palace in South India here lit up for Diwali

Some more Diwali Pictures as Ornate as can be.

*

Good or Bad – Let it be

Hasty changes
Unimagined gains
Unforeseen challenges
Tested my patience
…as they do in all years

Let go, move on
Carved new trails
I let hope and faith
Heal my baffled heart
…like I do in all years

Isolation does not kill
But wrong people will.
Detachment and rumination
Granted soothing peace
…had longed for it in all years

Pensive pen moved
Witty words poured
Call it blogging or writing
Wonderful blogging friends
…took care of me this half-year

***

The poem was for The Daily Prompt: How is this year shaping up so far? Write a post about your biggest challenges and achievements thus far.  State of Your Year

(And similar poems I wrote in December/Jan for the New Year 2015 :
Happy New Second and The Renovated Me)

Turnover a New Leaf

today’s first thoughts (are) 
stale left-overs from yesterday

unresolved balance of
good and bad carried forward

old murky baggage
wrapped in laundered fresh cover

cryptic dark dreams
radiating with rays of fresh hopes

surviving life one day at a time
with this daily dose of hope

 

(In response to The Daily Post’s writing prompt: “First Light.” and Hope)