In Transit…

yllo

 

Early Ephemeral Signs

The weather man declares
Here’s your last day of summer
Be prepared, relish the change

I wonder at their confident claims
And look for subtle signs of change
Nature’s fleeting moods and frames

Yes! Yellowing greens, falling leaves
True! Shorter days, stillness in the air
Not too hot, and not yet cold here

Summer’s silently slipping away
Auburn autumn’s not too far away
Winter will soon be on its way

~~~

Transitory Thoughts

Toddling childhood
Romps away
Youth a guest
Never overstays
Fleeting desires
Melting moments
Nothing remains but
Cobweb of memories of
Tangled mesh of wishes
That refuse to untangle
One day, the last breath
Resolves everything
Good or bad, all
Comes to naught, like
Dispersing dewdrops

© 2016 Alka Girdhar

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These are my two poems written in response to The Daily Post’s today’s writing prompt: Fleeting

 

To Love the Coming and Going of Seasons

If we want, we can be happy in every season.

A heart full of love is the prime reason, that even when all seasons turn, turn, turn they still carry a special beautiful meaning for us. Here, by love I mean love between young or old lovers, between happily married couples or love within your family, friends and general humanity.

Our age and vitality is another reason. By age, I do not mean just physically young age with its plentiful energy and zeal to live, but also the youthfulness of heart in people who are ‘young at heart’.

Which means, to a generally happy and content heart, all seasons seem good.  An unhappy heart will not even notice the change in seasons. Thus, abundant love and youthful feelings at any age can make us look forward to any season.

When love sprouts in our heart early on, everything is romantic and wears a rosy sheen.P1050651 Spring flowers and bird songs carry a special meaning for a heart in love.

Likewise, heavy rain that is at its worst during a full-swing rainy season, may often be abhorred by others around you, but if you are in a desirable company of someone you love, you won’t mind walking in the rain for miles, even without umbrella. Similarly, a group of youthful (young at heart) friends in a mood to enjoy rainy season will love every drop of water falling on their fresh faces. For the same reason, sitting indoors in our home and hearth with our families, even when wild rain thuds and creates noise, is far from scary. Rainy season becomes a family occasion for special food being cooked, a charming fun event.

For a person with heart full of love, dry autumn leaves seem to sway and fall gracefully; and walking on crunchy leaves hand-in-hand with your loved one creates a rustling music like in no other season does.

Likewise, winters too seem unpleasantly cold only if our hearts have gone cold and frozen. Oh for the love that melts ice in our hearts, the chill within relationships!  These clichéd thoughts remind me of the song ‘Frozen’ by Madonna, and the lyrics ‘you’re frozen, when your heart’s not open

Oh well! That was one way of viewing seasons, that is, accepting the reality that it is our personal feelings that make seasons influence us positively or negatively. Too much happiness and too much unhappiness render us oblivious to any good or bad changes around us.

And yet, other than our personal moods, there is also a certain practical and physical side to it. The hard facts. On seeing myriad colorful flowers and after inhaling sudden fragrances of spring, even a very sad unloved person is liable to cheer up for the time being. That is the power of nature and flowers. To a person in a normal mood, most fruit and flower trees anyway give greater joy during spring season.

Some time ago, during late spring, this fig tree in my yard was lush green and full of figs, but now so barren, with every fruit and leaf gone. Few days ago, in early winters, on seeing a few off-season figs, I felt sudden joy and delight, more than on seeing a tree full of figs in their full season.

Which means, other than love in our hearts that makes us sensitive towards seasons, there is some definite impact of seasonal changes via physical beauty of nature, as also through other physical consequences of changing seasons, esp. the extremes of heat and cold.  Ask a homeless and poor person which season he/she likes the best. Can’t be winters. And even a rich person, who is badly susceptible to catching flu in winters, cannot be in love with this season, even though he/she can afford best possible medical help.

Moreover, shorter winter days seem to be generally less productive. Physical mobility is also less if one finds it hard to wake up early and go to work. But that means, winters provide plenty of rest and warm snug sleep. Now that too is a blessing if not carried too far! Other than that if and when sun comes out during winters, which is plentiful in Australia, it is highly welcome.

That way, summers get many things done what with their longer sunny hours. But then again summers produce scorching heat accompanied by physical exhaustion throughout the day. Nature counteracts this by providing treasures of summer fruits, that we can top up with drinks and ice-creams.

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Rain drops today – from my front door

See, I can go on and on and justify that all seasons are good if we have open hearts, and as for our comfort, well nature shows a balancing act in all seasons.

Personally speaking, at all times in life, whether there is abundant love or no love around me, extreme happiness or no happiness, I have no complaint with any season. For I am lucky that I am not homeless during severe heat, cold or rain. I count my blessings, that I still have many reasons to be happy in life, irrespective of seasonal tantrums and turnovers.

~~~ ~~~

In response to The Daily Post’s writing prompt: Turn, Turn, Turn
Seasons change so quickly! Which one do you most look forward to? Which is your least favorite?

. Also for WPC photo prompt Seasons

 

Copyright © 2015 Alka Girdhar

Ruddy Season

That time of the year again, festive spirit of holy Christmas and New Year around. But what kind of holiday season beginning has this one been?  Actual red and ruddy Christmas, full of blood, bullets, terrorist attacks all around!!

In our Sydney city, recent Martin Place siege scared the whole city off. This is the suburb I had worked in for several years.

In Pakistan’s Peshawar city, more than 100 school children have been killed.  And today again I read the news about a mother who has killed her 8 children.  This was in Cairns Australia.

Well. Gloomy stuff. But one should always hope for the best. Move on is not the right word, but go out and try to enjoy the festivities.

Other than these incidents that deter celebrations, otherwise too things have changed for me over the years, at personal level .

Christmas holidays used to be an awaited time, esp. when my son was in school. Till Santa was real for him, Christmas held a special meaning. I came to Australia when he was almost three and now he’s 21.  We became kind of Hindu-Christians or should I say Christian-Hindus…I mean following both religions in one way or the other. Proving further the irrelevance of any one religion, or in fact benefit and relevance of imbibing goodness prevalent in all religions.

My son and I both like to sing, so come December, singing of carols became a regular feature. He plays violin, or at least used to.

But as my son grew up, things changed. More recently there has been lesser anticipation of any holidays. And yet, for us it’s never so boring or dull that we can’t wait the festive season to be over.

At the same time it’s not so exhilarating that we can say we have not had enough of it.

It’s now more a matter of fact kind of thing.  A balanced approach without any hype and hullabaloo. Of course, besides food and some simple family outings, one thing is always there, that is, post-Christmas sales and some shopping in January when most stores go 80% off.

So, like every other year, this year too we’ll see what we can do in these holidays to make our lives better, if not that of others.

My son when he was little

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I wrote this post last year. It was in response to The Daily Post’s writing prompt: Getting Seasonal.
The prompt asked us about holiday season: “Can’t get enough of it, or can’t wait for it all to be over already?  Has our attitude toward the end-of-year holidays changed over the years?”